On this episode I delve into the three questions everyone keeps asking: (1) What do you do if you’re competing against an existing vendor? (2) How do you create a sense of urgency on the part of your client? (3) What about the issue of qualifying – how do you know if you’re addressing what your clients need versus your own?

Those are the three hottest questions I’ve been asked of late, and because they’ve been coming up so often I wanted to spend this time answering them for you on today’s show.

Listen to this episode and discover:

– How do you tap into what’s really important to your client?
– What is the key to qualification and urgency?
– How to remove the risk of working with you over your competitors.
– Can urgency ever be created by you for your clients?
– And so much more…

Episode Overview

Of the three questions I’ve been asked so often lately the first one to start with is qualification. On this topic the one thing you have to remember when qualifying any deal or potential client is this: it doesn’t matter what you think is important, all that matters is what the client thinks is important. When you understand that and work with that knowledge, then you have the chance to create a long-lasting partnership.

And that moves us to the second question around urgency. Can you actually create urgency on behalf of your client? Can you make them feel the urgency of doing a deal? And the short answer is no.

The longer answer is you can ask questions that will help create an awareness of certain conditions that could create urgency for them. This is often a risk/reward situation so if you approach it factually you can better assess whether or not there is the potential for urgency down the road.

The third question I’ve been asked so often lately is what to do in competitive scenarios. How can you tell where you stand among your competitors in a given situation? The first rule here is to never talk trash about anyone else in your industry, not ever. Even if you’re telling the truth it will still sound like sour grapes to other people, and that’s not a reputation you want to have.

But what you can do is spell out what you understand the potential client’s needs are, and then provide the questions you think would be beneficial for them to ask of anyone they work with. Then finish with an offer to begin a working relationship with them on a shorter contract.

For example if the usual contract is three years offer to work with them for the first six months to make sure they have what they need, and then if you’re both happy you’ll sign the usual three year contract. You can tell them you are so confident they will be happy with your services you are willing to prove it before getting a long-term agreement.

By doing so you are removing their risk, you showed them you are more interested in their outcome and their results than you are in just making the sale and closing the deal. And even if they don’t choose to work with you you’ve provided questions they can ask of anyone to be certain they get what they need. You’ve set yourself apart from everyone else in your industry and every potential competitor by putting their needs ahead of your own.

Also on this special solo episode I’ll talk you through the exact sequence of questions to ask when you’re approaching a potential client who is already working with another vendor in your industry. I’ll tell you exactly what to say to get an honest assessment of their needs and any potential areas you can fix. Tune in to hear exactly how on this episode of Grow My Revenue.

On this episode I delve into the three questions everyone keeps asking: (1) What do you do if you’re competing against an existing vendor? (2) How do you create a sense of urgency on the part of your client? (3) What about the issue of qualifying – how do you know if you’re addressing what your clients need versus your own?

Those are the three hottest questions I’ve been asked of late, and because they’ve been coming up so often I wanted to spend this time answering them for you on today’s show.

Listen to this episode and discover:

– How do you tap into what’s really important to your client?
– What is the key to qualification and urgency?
– How to remove the risk of working with you over your competitors.
– Can urgency ever be created by you for your clients?
– And so much more…

Episode Overview

Of the three questions I’ve been asked so often lately the first one to start with is qualification. On this topic the one thing you have to remember when qualifying any deal or potential client is this: it doesn’t matter what you think is important, all that matters is what the client thinks is important. When you understand that and work with that knowledge, then you have the chance to create a long-lasting partnership.

And that moves us to the second question around urgency. Can you actually create urgency on behalf of your client? Can you make them feel the urgency of doing a deal? And the short answer is no.

The longer answer is you can ask questions that will help create an awareness of certain conditions that could create urgency for them. This is often a risk/reward situation so if you approach it factually you can better assess whether or not there is the potential for urgency down the road.

The third question I’ve been asked so often lately is what to do in competitive scenarios. How can you tell where you stand among your competitors in a given situation? The first rule here is to never talk trash about anyone else in your industry, not ever. Even if you’re telling the truth it will still sound like sour grapes to other people, and that’s not a reputation you want to have.

But what you can do is spell out what you understand the potential client’s needs are, and then provide the questions you think would be beneficial for them to ask of anyone they work with. Then finish with an offer to begin a working relationship with them on a shorter contract.

For example if the usual contract is three years offer to work with them for the first six months to make sure they have what they need, and then if you’re both happy you’ll sign the usual three year contract. You can tell them you are so confident they will be happy with your services you are willing to prove it before getting a long-term agreement.

By doing so you are removing their risk, you showed them you are more interested in their outcome and their results than you are in just making the sale and closing the deal. And even if they don’t choose to work with you you’ve provided questions they can ask of anyone to be certain they get what they need. You’ve set yourself apart from everyone else in your industry and every potential competitor by putting their needs ahead of your own.

Also on this special solo episode I’ll talk you through the exact sequence of questions to ask when you’re approaching a potential client who is already working with another vendor in your industry. I’ll tell you exactly what to say to get an honest assessment of their needs and any potential areas you can fix. Tune in to hear exactly how on this episode of Grow My Revenue.

On this episode I delve into the three questions everyone keeps asking: (1) What do you do if you’re competing against an existing vendor? (2) How do you create a sense of urgency on the part of your client? (3) What about the issue of qualifying – how do you know if you’re addressing what your clients need versus your own?

Those are the three hottest questions I’ve been asked of late, and because they’ve been coming up so often I wanted to spend this time answering them for you on today’s show.

Listen to this episode and discover:

– How do you tap into what’s really important to your client?
– What is the key to qualification and urgency?
– How to remove the risk of working with you over your competitors.
– Can urgency ever be created by you for your clients?
– And so much more…

Episode Overview

Of the three questions I’ve been asked so often lately the first one to start with is qualification. On this topic the one thing you have to remember when qualifying any deal or potential client is this: it doesn’t matter what you think is important, all that matters is what the client thinks is important. When you understand that and work with that knowledge, then you have the chance to create a long-lasting partnership.

And that moves us to the second question around urgency. Can you actually create urgency on behalf of your client? Can you make them feel the urgency of doing a deal? And the short answer is no.

The longer answer is you can ask questions that will help create an awareness of certain conditions that could create urgency for them. This is often a risk/reward situation so if you approach it factually you can better assess whether or not there is the potential for urgency down the road.

The third question I’ve been asked so often lately is what to do in competitive scenarios. How can you tell where you stand among your competitors in a given situation? The first rule here is to never talk trash about anyone else in your industry, not ever. Even if you’re telling the truth it will still sound like sour grapes to other people, and that’s not a reputation you want to have.

But what you can do is spell out what you understand the potential client’s needs are, and then provide the questions you think would be beneficial for them to ask of anyone they work with. Then finish with an offer to begin a working relationship with them on a shorter contract.

For example if the usual contract is three years offer to work with them for the first six months to make sure they have what they need, and then if you’re both happy you’ll sign the usual three year contract. You can tell them you are so confident they will be happy with your services you are willing to prove it before getting a long-term agreement.

By doing so you are removing their risk, you showed them you are more interested in their outcome and their results than you are in just making the sale and closing the deal. And even if they don’t choose to work with you you’ve provided questions they can ask of anyone to be certain they get what they need. You’ve set yourself apart from everyone else in your industry and every potential competitor by putting their needs ahead of your own.

Also on this special solo episode I’ll talk you through the exact sequence of questions to ask when you’re approaching a potential client who is already working with another vendor in your industry. I’ll tell you exactly what to say to get an honest assessment of their needs and any potential areas you can fix. Tune in to hear exactly how on this episode of Grow My Revenue.